Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp)

Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp) Australia
Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp) Australia
Product ID: ET-RPI-3-POWER

$19.95

We have 133 units of the Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp) in stock at our Sydney warehouse.

If ordered before 2pm, this part would be delivered on or before Wednesday, May 22 to most parts of Australia.

We can get a further 100 units from Raspberry Pi Australia.
If you order today we can dispatch this stock between Thursday, May 16 and Wednesday, May 22 2019.

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Raspberry Pi's Description of the Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp)

Description

This is the newest power supply we recommend for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

Product Specifications:

  • Input Voltage AC Max: 240V
  • Output Connector: USB Micro
  • Output Current Max: 2.5A
  • Output Power Max: 10W
  • Output Voltage Nom.: 5V
  • SVHC: No SVHC
  • 1.5m micro USB B Lead
  • Plug Type: Australian Adaptor
  • ErP level 6 efficiency rating

Note - colour / enclosure may vary

Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp) is listed in:
Raspberry Pi 3 Power Supply (5V 2.5 Amp) Guides
Create a NOOBS MicroSD Card

While there are many Raspberry Pi images to use, NOOBS is a great option for beginners. It is an easy operating system install manager. If you don't already have a NOOBS SD Card, you can create your own.

In this guide, you will learn how to format your microSD card, load NOOBS on it and install Raspbian.

It's the easiest way to get started with the Raspberry Pi!

Install TensorFlow on Raspberry Pi

Installing TensorFlow on the Raspberry Pi has never been easier.

With TensorFlow on your Raspberry Pi, you can create neural networks that can perform image recognition, data classification and more!

In this guide, we will install the open source machine learning library TensorFlow by cloning the repository from Github. We will use a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and the recommended power supply for it.

Installing TensorFlow will enable you to complete out other AI guides.

Get Started with Pi Camera V2

The Raspberry Pi Camera V2 board  is a high quality 8 megapixel Sony IMX219 image sensor custom designed add-on board for Raspberry Pi, featuring a fixed focus lens. It's capable of 3280 x 2464 pixel static images, and also supports 1080p30, 720p60 and 640x480p60/90 video. It attaches to Pi by way of one of the small sockets on the board upper surface and uses the dedicated CSi interface, designed especially for interfacing to cameras. 

In this guide, you will learn to set up and get started with the Raspberry Pi Camera V2 using Python and picamera.

After this, you will be able to work on more advanced projects such as a time-lapse camera, a home security system, motion detection, time lapse photography, slow-motion video and much more!

Edit Text Files on a Raspberry Pi

Learning to edit text files on the Raspberry Pi is an important first step.

In this guide, we will look at how you can edit text files on the Raspberry Pi. You will learn to view text files, edit it from the command line, open text files in the Text Editor from the command line, and use Nano. While a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and its power supply is used here, this guide will work for the other Raspberry Pi boards, too.

By doing so, this will enable you to advance onto further projects.

Create a Google Calendar Reminder Device with Raspberry Pi

With how busy life can get, it's easy to forget about important appointments even if they are set up in your Google Calendar reminders.

In this guide, we will build a Visual Appointment Reminder device that will connect with your Google Calendar. We will use a Blinkt! LED strip and a Raspberry Pi Zero WH (Zero W with Headers) - v1.3 to construct the device. That said, it will work with other Raspberry Pi boards too.

After completing this guide, you will have a handy visual appointment reminder device that will remind you of any upcoming appointments.

Use the Sense HAT Emulator in Raspbian

The Sense HAT is a very useful piece of Raspberry Pi hardware. It adds a variety of sensors such as a gyroscope, accelerometer, magnetometer, temperature sensor, barometric pressure sensor, and humidity sensor. If you've ever wanted to try your hands on coding with one, you don't actually need the Sense HAT itself!

In this guide, you will learn how to program the Sense HAT and run it in the Sense HAT emulator on Raspbian. We will use a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, although it will work for the other Raspberry Pi boards too. 

After doing so, you may wish to get an actual physical Sense HAT and you will be able to program it with ease!

Set Up VNC on Raspberry Pi

Sometimes, you'll want to be able to access your Raspberry Pi remotely. 

With VNC built into Raspbian, you can! In this guide, you will learn how to set up RealVNC on the Raspberry Pi and access your Raspberry Pi remotely on the Mac OS. That said, this will also work for Windows or Linux operating systems as there are RealVNC clients for them as well. 

The completion of this guide will enable you to access your Raspberry Pi remotely for future projects.

Run Android on Raspberry Pi

Emteria.OS is the first proper Android release for the Raspberry Pi. Though there is already the RTAndroid, an older solution, Emteria.OS is a full build of Android, and you can get it for free to use as an individual.

In this guide, you will learn to use Emteria.OS to get Android running on your Raspberry Pi, and download Android apps on it.

Completing this guide will enable you to use the Android operating system on the Raspberry Pi in your future projects!

Create a File Server using Samba

If you've ever wanted to set up a file server, this guide is for you. 

You will learn how to use Samba to turn your Raspberry Pi into a local file server for your network. 

Once you have set it up, you can use your newly created file server on all other computers on your network and have a convenient place to store everything you want to share with housemates, friends or family.

Use Analogue Sensors with Raspberry Pi

While the Raspberry Pi can control digital inputs and outputs, what if you wanted to read analog signals? 

In this guide, we'll connect up an Analogue to Digital Converter (the MCP3008) to the Raspberry Pi, and then connect a light dependent resistor (LDR) or light sensor to it. We will then program it to read and output values from the LDR.

After completing this guide, feel free to connect other analogue sensors to your Raspberry Pi!

Use a Push Button with Raspberry Pi

Push buttons are an essential component in many Raspberry Pi projects and have many uses. 

In this guide, we will connect a momentary push button to a Raspberry Pi and program it using the GPIO Zero library. Upon button press, it will print out the words, "Button has been pressed!"

After completing this guide, you will have gained a basic understanding of how to wire up and program push buttons with the Raspberry Pi.

Blink an LED with Raspberry Pi

One of the simplest ways to get started with physical computing is to get an LED to turn on and off. 

In this guide, we will get an LED to blink by connecting it to a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. We will then program it using the GPIO Zero Python library. 

On completion of this guide, you will have gained a better understanding of how to utilise LEDs as well as on programming your Raspberry Pi.

Getting Started with the Sense HAT

Previously, you might have tried your hands with programming the Sense HAT emulator

In this guide, you will get started with using an actual Sense HAT with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. 

 After completing this guide, you will have gathered real-world data using the Sense HAT.

Raspberry Pi and MaKey MaKey Operation Game

Get familiar with the Raspberry Pi and MaKey MaKey board by starting with a simple project.

In this guide, we will be recreating the Operation Game with a Raspberry Pi and MaKey MaKey board.

7-Inch LCD Touch Screen with Raspberry Pi

The 7 inch LCD HDMI Display for Raspberry Pi 3  supports 800x480 resolution and has touch screen control capabilities. But it requires a few modifications before it can be used. 

In this guide, we will show you how to set it up with the Rasperry Pi to get it up and running quickly.

You could build a Raspberry Pi tablet or a digital photo frame with it, just to name a few examples.

5-Inch Touch Screen Display with Raspberry Pi

The 5 inch LCD HDMI Display for Raspberry Pi 3  supports 800x480 resolution and has touch screen control capabilities. But it requires a few modifications before it can be used. 

In this guide, we will show you how to attach it to the Pi, then get it up and running quickly!

Some examples of what you could build with it includes a Raspberry Pi tablet, handheld game console or a digital photo frame.