Build Your Own Lc Meter With Frequency

Software engineer Kerry Wong as designed and documented an LC meter (that's inductance and capacitance) that also measures freqency. It is based on the ATmega328 microcontroller and uses Arduino libraries for the end results. This is an easy project to follow, and with some small effort the final results can look quite good, for example:

Furthermore you can save a lot of money by doing it yourself, and learn a lot during the process. So to get started, visit Kerry's blog here. And for more news, updates and items of interest.please follow us on twitter, Facebook and Google+.

To build your own LC meter, we have the components, a huge range of enclosures, and of course the ATmega328. Plus a full range of LCD modules including an I2C-controlled unit from DFrobot that is simple to use and doesn't use any digital I/O pins:


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Diy Avr Based Video Games

Using a simple circuit based on a Atmel ATmega168 you can build a simple video game system that allows playback through a television or composite video monitor. The games included with the source code are Snake and Tetris, for example:

Considering the minimalist hardware approach, the games are quite effective. You could also reduce the size of the system by hand-building an SMT version as well. However to get started, check out Ben Ryve's detailed page here. And for more news, updates and items of interest.please follow us on twitter, Facebook and Google+.

If you're not keen on programming directly for ATmega microncontrollers, you can achieve similar results with the Arduino ecosystem by using a Video Game Shield kit:

The Video Game Shield is an Arduino add-on shield to make your own video games, including graphics, text, sound effects, and music! Using the power of open source, this shield includes everything you need to make awesome black-and-white video games on your TV. It supports up to two Nintendo Wii Nunchuck controllers for an easy and familiar interface.

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Control Webcams Over The Internet With Arduino


By using some Meccano, an Internet-connected Arduino board and a variety of electronics, you can create your own web-controlled webcam that can be rotated over the web, or also locally using a thumb joystick. The purpose for doing so is to allow the distant party on a Skype conversation to view around the local room whilst on the conversation.


It's simple to make and quite useful for regular webcam use.. To get started, visit the project page for notes and the code here. And for more news, updates and items of interest.please follow us on twitter, Facebook and Google+.

At Little Bird Electronics we have the thumb joysticks, matching breakout boards and a great Internet-enabled board - the Freetronics EtherTen. Apart from being fully Arduino Uno-compatible, it has onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and supports optional Power-over-Ethernet:

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