Little Bird Micro:Bit Advent Kit 2018

Little Bird Micro:Bit Advent Kit 2018 Australia
Little Bird Micro:Bit Advent Kit 2018 Australia Little Bird Micro:Bit Advent Kit 2018 Australia
Product ID: LB-LS0822-AD

$79.95

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Description
Updated 12 days ago
Data Sheets & Documents
Updated 5 months ago
Collections
Updated 12 days ago
Learning Resources
24 Guides
Little Bird's Description of the Little Bird Micro:Bit Advent Kit 2018

Description


Tired of chocolate and your kids bouncing off the walls?

Why not learn how to use the micro:bit in bite-sized chunks this year using the all-new 2018 Little Bird Micro:bit Advent Calendar Kit. It's the perfect way to get started with coding and electronics. 

What is the BBC micro:bit? 

The BBC Micro Bit is a small, code-able device that is an easy/non-intimidating introduction to programming and making – just switch it on and program it to do something fun. You can then wear it or even customise it!

What do I get as part of the kit?

The Little Bird  Micro:bit Advent Kit includes 24 tutorials that teach you both how to use the micro:bit with various sensors and electronics with real-world applications, every day leading up to the big day. Access to the tutorials will be provided daily starting December 1st 2018.

Each kit and tutorial has been handcrafted by the Little Bird Team.

What will I know after completing the advent kit?

After completing the 24 days you (or your kids) will know how to connect sensors and actuators to the BBC micro:bit and get a taste for visual programming, Arduino and Python.

Kit includes:

  • BBC micro:bit + USB Cable
  • Breadboard
  • Jumper Wires
  • LEDs (Multicolour RGB and single colours)
  • Temperature Sensor
  • Push Buttons
  • Potentiometer
  • Buzzer
  • Sound Sensor
  • IR Sensor
  • Tilt Sensor
  • Temperature and Humidity Sensor
  • Relay Actuator
  • Hall Effect Sensor (for detecting magnetic fields)
  • Laser Module
  • Light Dependent Resistor Module
  • Dual-axis XY Joystick Module
  • LED Display Clock Module
  • Reed Switch

... and more!


Little Bird Micro:Bit Advent Kit 2018 Guides
Use a Two Colour LED Module with micro:bit

Want to make an LED light up and easily change their colours?

In this guide, we will learn to use a handy little LED module and make it blink using the micro:bit!

After completing this guide, you will understand how to use an LED and create a simple program using MakeCode. 

If you're using the Micro:bit Advent Calendar, you'll need the contents of the bags labelled 1 and 25.

Make an RGB LED Blink with micro:bit

You might have already tried your hands at making a two colour LED module blink with the micro:bit, but have you tried using an RGB LED module? 

In this guide, you will learn to make an RGB LED blink and change to a variety of colours. 

Complete this guide to learn the basics of programming an RGB LED!

If you're using the Micro:bit Advent Calendar, you'll need the contents of the bags labelled 2 and 25.

Push Button with micro:bit

While the micro:bit already has two on-board push buttons, button A and button B, you can add more buttons to control the micro:bit. 

In this guide, you will learn to connect an external push button to the micro:bit, and get it to turn turn an LED on and off. The push button module is comprised of a momentary push button switch and an in-built resistor. 

After completing this guide, you will know how to add more buttons to your micro:bit which will come in handy when you go on to make all sorts of  projects.

4-Digit Counter with micro:bit

Besides having the onboard LED display on the micro:bit, you can also add an external display to it.

In this guide, we will use the micro:bit and an external 4 digit display to create a counter. We will use the TMP1637 package in the MakeCode editor to do this.

After completing this guide, you will have gained a basic understanding of how to use a 4 digit display module with the micro:bit.

Control LED Brightness Using a Potentiometer

You might have already played with an LED and gotten it to blink  using the micro:bit. 

In this guide, you will be introduced to the potentiometer and program it using MakeCode and on the Arduino IDE to change an LED's brightness. 

Once you have finished this guide, you will know how to use potentiometers with the micro:bit. You will make an LED light dimmer with it! Potentiometer can be used for all sorts of projects, from volume control to MIDI, just to name a few examples.

Create a Doorbell with micro:bit

While the micro:bit has its own on-board pushbuttons, to play any sound you will need an external speaker or buzzer.

In this guide, we will create a simple doorbell using an external pushbutton and a buzzer module. We will also use a second micro:bit as a handheld device that will notify you when someone has pressed the doorbell. 

Learn the basics and go on to customise your own build! 

Reed Switch with micro:bit

A reed switch is an electrical switch which is operated when a magnetic field is brought near to it. 

In this guide, you will learn how to connect it to the micro:bit and turn an LED as well as an alarm on and off. We will then test it with a magnet.

Complete this guide and use it to create a security alarm system. Most alarm systems use a magnetic reed switch on doors and windows. They may come in different forms and styles, but they operate using the same principle!

0.96'' OLED Screen with micro:bit

The micro:bit has 25 programmable LEDs in a 5x5 matrix, which allows you to display text, numbers and images. But what if you wanted to use a different screen altogether?

In this guide, we will use a 0.96'' OLED display screen with the micro:bit. We will be using the MU editor to program the micro:bit using MicroPython. Alternatively, the micro:bit can also be programmed using the MakeCode editor. Sample code is provided at the end of the tutorial.

Finishing this guide will mean you have not only programmed in MicroPython, but you are one step closer to using the OLED display in your own micro:bit projects!

Thermistor Sensor Module with micro:bit

In this guide, we will learn to use a thermistor. They are useful little components that change their resistance with temperature.

Completing this guide will teach you about thermistors and its relationship between resistance and temperature. 

Measure Temperature and Humidity with micro:bit

While the micro:bit can estimate the ambient temperature, it isn't as accurate as using an external temperature sensor. This is because the micro:bit actually measures the temperature of a silicon die on its CPU. 

In this guide, you will learn to use an external temperature sensor module and the micro:bit to make a temperature and humidity display! 

After completing this guide, you can use it to detect the temperature around you much more accurately.

Raindrop Sensor with micro:bit

A raindrop module is a useful little tool for detecting when it rains and also for measuring rainfall intensity.

In this guide, we will connect a raindrop sensor module to the micro:bit and prototype a rain detection device!

Finish this guide and get started with creating your own rain detection device. 

Temperature Sensor with micro:bit

We can get an estimate of the temperature using the Micro:bit, though what is actually provided is the temperature of the silicon die on its main CPU. But what if you wanted to get even more accurate temperature readings? 

In this guide, we will use a DS18B20 temperature sensor module with the Micro:bit. This temperature sensor is able to get readings like 23.50 degree celsius rather than just 23 degree celsius. 

Complete this guide to get started with using this very useful component, where it could be used for data logging, gardening assistance and more!

Tilt Sensor with micro:bit

A tilt sensor is a type of sensor that allows the detection of orientation, and are tiny, inexpensive and low-power components. They can be used as a simple way to detect orientation.

How it works: Tilt sensors are typically cylindrically shaped tubes with a conductive object such as a rolling ball contained within. When the sensor is tilted downwards, the conductive ball no longer completes the circuit. But when returned to the normal upward position, the balls make contact and the circuit is completed.

In this guide, we will learn to connect the tilt sensor to a micro:bit, and make it turn an LED on and off. Completing this guide will enable you to use the tilt sensor in your own projects.

Sound Sensor with micro:bit

In this guide, you can use the Arduino IDE or MakeCode editor to program a micro:bit with a sound sensor. When the vibration or sound level goes above the threshold level, an LED will light up. 

Complete this guide to get started with creating your own sound detection device using the micro:bit!

Infrared Obstacle Avoidance Sensor with micro:bit

An infrared obstacle avoidance sensor receives a signal when there is an object blocking its path.

In this guide, you will learn to connect an infrared obstacle avoidance sensor with the micro:bit, and get it to turn an LED off when an obstacle such as your hand or a piece of white paper is in its path.

Complete this guide to learn the basics and use it in your own projects. Some examples of what it can be used for include security alarm systems or an obstacle avoidance robot.

Atmospheric Pressure Sensor with micro:bit

A barometric pressure sensor can measure the air pressure and temperature around you. 

In this guide, we will connect a BMP280 barometric pressure sensor to the micro:bit, and program it using MakeCode. 

Follow these steps to get started with this useful little component. 

Rotary Encoder with micro:bit

Today, we will learn about another electro-mechanical switch, the rotary encoder. It is a unique component as its output signal can be used to determine the direction that its knob is being rotated. Not only that, but it is capable of continuous rotation, unlike a regular potentiometer.

In this guide, we will connect it to a micro:bit and program it using the MakeCode editor.

After completing this guide, you will understand the basics in using a rotary encoder. This can be used to create many useful projects, such as a volume controller for your music or even a MIDI device to make your own music!

Create a Light-sensitive Alarm with micro:bit

A buzzer is an audio signalling device. There are two types of buzzers, a passive buzzer and an active buzzer. In this guide, we will learn to differentiate between the two, then connect a passive buzzer module to the micro:bit and get it to play a song and change its bpm with a button press. 

A light dependent resistor will also be added to the circuit, to create an alarm clock that automatically rings when it gets bright!

After completing this guide, you will understand the basics involved in using a buzzer, and can go on to make your own creations!

Hall Effect Sensor with micro:bit

A hall effect sensor consists of a thin rectangular conductor material, that can be used to detect the presence of magnetic fields. Normally, no current flows through the circuit. But in the presence of a magnetic field, the hall effect sensor turns 'ON' and current can flow through the circuit.

In this guide, we will learn to connect it to the micro:bit using a breakout board and breadboard, and get it to turn on an LED when a magnet is near.

1-channel Relay with micro:bit

A relay is an electromagnetic switch. It is turned on by a small current but can turn on or off a much larger electric current. This is immensely useful as they can be used both as switches as well as amplifiers (converting small currents to large currents).

In this guide, you will learn to connect a relay to the micro:bit and get it to turn a light on and off.

You can use relays are used in all sorts of things, and you can find them used in cars and computer boards just to name a few examples.

Laser Head Sensor with micro:bit

A laser head sensor module is one of many useful external components that you can connect to your micro:bit!

In this guide, you will learn to connect the micro:bit with a laser head sensor module and create your own tripwire alarm system. With the addition of a light dependent resistor, the alarm will start to sound when the laser is broken.

By finishing this guide, you will have created a simple tripwire alarm system.

Using LEDs with micro:bit

A light-emitting diode (LED) is a semiconductor device that emits light when an electric current passes through it.

In this guide, you will learn to connect a light-dependent resistor module to the micro:bit, and program it to turn an LED on when it get dark enough! In the second part of this guide, you will create a light show by using multiple external LEDs!

Complete this guide to learn how to use external LEDs with the micro:bit!

Smoke sensor with micro:bit

This is the MQ-2 smoke sensor module. It is a device that is sensitive to flammable gases such as LPG, propane, and methane.

In this guide, we will learn to connect it to the micro:bit and program it to sound an alarm, if it goes above the threshold level. When it is below the threshold level, a heart icon will be displayed instead.

Complete this guide to understand the basics on how to use a smoke sensor.

Joystick module with micro:bit

The dual-axis joystick module has two independent potentiometers, one per axis, and can be easily connected to the breadboard! 

In this guide, we will create a fast reaction-time game with the micro:bit, and use the joystick module as a controller. 

After completing this guide, you will have learned how to program a basic game as well as its controls.